TASTE & POWER

Children of the World, Unite!

Posted in Art, Film by TASTE & POWER on January 6, 2010

FAMILY IS AN ECONOMIC UNIT, LOVE IS STICKY, WE FEEL AT HOME JUST ABOUT EVERYWHERE. PRIVATE PROPERTY IS CUTE, BUT THE LAW THAT PROTECTS IT WAS ERECTED TO PROTECT THE FIRST ACT OF STEALING. OBJECTS TALK, BUT THE LAW, LIKE A THIEF, IS SILENT. OBJECTS TALK, BUT THEY DONT SAY ALL THEY KNOW, THEY KEEP THEIR SECRETS FOR THEMSELVES.

Guy Ben-Ner’s narrative video Stealing Beauty (2007) was shot in secret at 3 different IKEA’s in 3 different countries, as Ben-Ner and his actors(his family) were forced to change locations every time they were caught taping.  The story depicts a family’s trials after their youngest is caught stealing at school.  It explores themes of globalism, public spaces, private property, consumerism, family, love and theft.  You can watch the video in it’s entirety on UbuWeb.

CHILDREN OF THE WORLD, UNITE!  RELEASE THE FUTURE FROM THE SHACKLES OF THE PAST!  MY PEERS, IT IS OUR TIME TO STEAL!  NOT IN ORDER TO GAIN PROPERTY, BUT IN ORDER TO LOSE RESPECT FOR IT.  PROPERTY IS LIKE A GHOST: YOU CAN NOT POSSESS IT WITHOUT BEING POSSESSED BY IT.  STEAL, AND LET OTHERS STEAL.  LET PROPERTY MOVE FREELY FROM PLACE TO PLACE SO IT WILL NOT HAUNT YOUR HOME.  STEAL FROM THE LOCAL SUPERMARKET, STEAL FROM THE CITY!  STEAL FROM THE STATE. STEAL FROM YOUR PARENTS!  AND ABOVE ALL, DON’T ACCEPT INHERITANCE: STEAL IT!  ROB YOUR PARENTS, AND RID YOURSELF OF PROMISES YOU WILL HAVE TO KEEP!  CHILDREN OF THE WORLD, UNITE!

Brian Faucette’s Thankless Task of Living Your Life For You

Posted in Art, Faith, Religion, self help by TASTE & POWER on January 4, 2010

The Thankless Task of Living Your Life For You is the blog of artist Brian Faucette, who’s works address systems of meaning and value taken for granted by the bastions of contemporary culture.  Faucette works in a variety of media, but here we are given a chance to glimpse his daily explorations of writing and digital graphic works, which he approaches, as in his paintings and sculptures, from an ostensibly formalist position, which is then constantly called into self-reflexive question and doubt as he undercuts the sacred mythology of modernism with the profanity of the earnest.

Danzig videos

Posted in Art, Faith, Film, Music, Religion, Uncategorized by TASTE & POWER on January 4, 2010

Glenn Danzig “Welcome to My Book Collection”

then Chuck Biscuits talks about his amazing collection of classic vintage cereal boxes

Available, sometimes, on VHS on ebay and at swap meets near you.

Redemption Center Rooftop Sculpture Show

Posted in Art by danielheidkamp on August 14, 2008

      August 10, 2008, a rain swept Sunday marked the opening of the Redemption Center Rooftop Sculpture Show in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn.  Featuring the work of twenty-six artists, the huge multi-tiered industrial roof looks something like an epic dystopian mini-golf course.  The singular requirement for work was “large sculpture only” and nothing is bigger than host/curator Josh Duensing’s “Spider Man.”  Wrapped around two sides of the roof’s central brick elevator shaft the 13ft chicken wire and paper-mache Spidey scales the wall looking lean and mean in his customary red and blue costume.  The visual punch line comes, especially to the delight of some local neighborhood youths, when rounding the corner of the shaft—Spiderman’s hindquarters appear absurdly disproportionate.  With a tiny head, a tiny left arm, and a huge, huge body, Duensing’s “Spider Man” suggests that even the best of us must sometimes carry a heavy load.

            Anais Daly offers an intoxicating (or asphyxiating) psychotic self-portrait made of melted audio and videotapes.  The six foot tall creature with shocked cassette reel eyes rises from the rooftop like the night of the living dead. I wondered if it’s lumpy black exterior represented mankind’s decaying soul or Daly’s lungs after melting all that plastic (she promised she used a respirator…).  The most formally taut piece in the show was Dmitri Hertz’s “Wagon Wheel Barbells.” Combining the feel of 19th century athletics and late 20th century minimalism, Hertz’s symmetrical metal and rubber construction embodies old times and new—only the strongest man can lift this one off the ground. Brian Faucette’s sculpture made of wood, brightly colored wigs, and dripping pigments, was the most painterly in the show.  Here, as he has done several times this summer, Faucette proves once again that his unique sensibilities translate in all mediums.   

             Certain sculptures, such as Lindsay Beebe’s mucky roadside memorial, Dan Turner’s silver spray painted truck tires, Erik Lindman’s paint chip installation, and Boris Chesakov’s alphabet clothes line, seemed to have emerged from and remain intrinsically connected to the industrial urban cityscape in which they are situated.  Other pieces, namely Nick Payne’s “Pilgrim Shitter”, and Jennie Ross/Joe Johnson’s hanging hotdog planetarium diorama, stand uniquely in contrast to their surroundings.  Miles Huston, who is known for his concise conceptual experiments, offers an ambiguous architectural structure made of wood, yellow striped domed windows, a hand constructed office chair and some potted plants.  While this object is visually compact, it is conceptually scattered: is it about climate change? Utopian housing? The War in Afghanistan? Can we ever know?

 

            Other notable sculptures include Sean Townley’s proto-Hegalian rock tower, Emilie Waterhouse’s 25ft plant stand, and of course the performance piece by Kate Levant who became a living sculpture by covering her body with hundreds of crawling lady bugs.  

 

 

Dan Heidkamp, 2008

if you haven’t fled the swamp air yet

Posted in Art, Music by teenagediet on July 30, 2008

these things are going down

Summer Breeze Makes Me Feel Fine

Posted in Art, self help by teenagediet on July 26, 2008

Imagine a perfect summer day. Not a care in the world, just sittin’ out in the sun bronzin’.  On a day like this its hard to have a care in the world, much less wrap your brain around a concept more complex than applying sun tan lotion and mixing a margarita. Now imagine this is everyday. Yes you are correct, that is exactly why people in L.A. don’t “get stuff”. If you are in N.Y. you should come out to this today.

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Jenkem use in Brooklyn

Posted in Art by oldmandub on July 26, 2008

For those of you who don’t know, Jenkem is a way to get high off of human feces. In the book Children of AIDS: Africa’s Orphan Crisis by Emma Guest, the making of Jenkem is described as “fermented human sewage, scraped from pipes and stored in plastic bags for a week or so, until it gives off numbing, intoxicating fumes.” The smell of feces that permeates the borough of Brooklyn has always been thought to create the same effects of doing Jenkem directly, but now it’s clear that it acts like the airborne hallucinogen in Batman Begins and causes kids there to enjoy looking at shitty, ugly things.

“Wait’ll They Get A Load Of Me.”

Posted in Art, Film, Politics, Religion, self help by oldmandub on July 23, 2008

When Heath Ledger died back in January I probably mourned with little more than a shrug. I hadn’t jumped on the bandwagon to see him play a star-crossed gay cowboy. While a bunch of people went out to see I’m Not There, I wasn’t there. And I think there were at least ten things I found distasteful with Ten Things I Hate About You. However, after seeing his version of The Joker in The Dark Knight I now see there’s plenty to be sad about.

While credit is certainly owed to Christopher Nolan for writing the extraordinary dialogue that Mr. Ledger clearly relished in, his was more than acting. It was the disappearance of an actor into words on paper only to reemerge as an icon that graced us with an obliterating blow to all other possible and existing performances of The Joker. This Joker personified those moments at rock bottom some of us have when we say, “Fuck it. One day our star will engulf any residue of humanity anyway.” These moments are potential gateways to absolute freedom. The kind of freedom that is knowing that we are going to die some day and that nothing matters except in what it means to us here and now. Knowing that our manmade institutions and concepts are stifling to what we truly can be. These moments can be chilling and thankfully most of us seem to crawl our way out. Nonetheless I found his performance serene.

Heath Ledger’s The Joker is Taste and Power, in the way that I wish I could have it. He has the taste for anarchy and the power of an “agent of chaos.” In January I shrugged. But after seeing The Dark Knight I truly miss a man I never knew.

Ultra Eczema Records

Posted in Art, Music by teenagediet on April 28, 2008

Ultra Eczema Records out of Belgium is known for making beautifully pressed copies of basically everything that actually matters in music these days, but you already knew that. Here is a copy of them (him?) DJing for a Finnish radio show. 080426.mp3. Enjoy.

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It Ain’t Easy

Posted in Art by thedumpsterbaby on April 27, 2008

Smoke Eaters, 1975, Jill Freedman

Great piece in the today’s New York Times Sunday Edition by a friend of T&P’s about the life and times of forgotten NY street photographer Jill Freeman. Yesterday the foothills behind my house caught on fire, and last night, on my way home from the grocery store, I passed group after group of “photographers” holding up their digital point-and-shoots (some on tripods) and camera phones and it made me think about how the ease of using these new technologies had democratized the medium, and how many more crappy photos are floating around the world as a result. This is not entirely terrible, but this article made me think about how many great photographers there must be from the lost age of the F-Stop which have eluded well-deserved recognition in recent times. So read.